Vaxzevria: AstraZeneca Attempts to Save Its Experimental Shots by Changing the Name

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Vaxzevria: AstraZeneca Attempts to Save Its Experimental Shots by Changing the Name

by TheCOVIDBlog.com
March 31, 2021

 

The AstraZeneca COVID-19 shot is called “Covishield” in India. It is now called “Vaxzevria” in the European Union.

BRUSSELS, BELGIUM — The Nisour Square massacre took the lives of 17 Iraqi civilians on September 16, 2007. Six Blackwater employees faced murder and manslaughter charges. Four of them were sentenced to 30 years or life in prison. The incident left a major stain on the U.S. military contractor’s reputation and brand. No problem.

Blackwater changed its name to Xe Services, LLC. in 2009. It changed its name again to Academi in 2011, before merging with Constellis Holdings in 2014. Today “Blackwater” is still getting multi-billion dollar government contracts without anyone ever mentioning its real name and history. AstraZeneca is employing the same strategy hoping for the same results.

The Oxford-AstraZeneca COVID-19 “vaccine” has by far the worst reputation of all the experimental shots. We’ve covered at least 10 deaths related to the AstraZeneca shots. Virtually every country using the experimental AstraZeneca shots suspended administration of them pending investigations. Authorities in some of said countries seized the shots as part of criminal investigations.

The British-Swedish pharmaceutical company is desperate to save its signature COVID-19 product and salvage its brand in the pharmaceutical world. So it changed its name.

AstraZeneca COVID-19 shot is now Vaxzevria

The Swedish Medical Products Agency (Läkemedelsverket) announced that the name change was approved by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) on March 25. The product itself remains unchanged. But Vaxzevria has different labeling and packaging that is distinct from the old AstraZeneca branding. The whole idea is to deflect attention from the flawed and deadly shots and start anew with different marketing strategies.

AstraZeneca is betting on the same results it has obtained in India. The Serum Institute of India produces the AstraZeneca shot under the brand name Covishield. Thus there has been no AstraZeneca news in India. The trademark application for “Vaxzevria” commenced in December. So this was not a spontaneous reaction to the bad publicity for the AstraZeneca shots. The name was likely intended for another product. But it was already available for this “emergency use” if you will.

It’s safe to say that most Europeans associate AstraZeneca with poison and danger. A YouGov survey released on March 21 found that 61% of French citizens view AstraZeneca/Vaxzevria shots as unsafe. A majority of Germans (55%) also believe the AstraZeneca/Vaxzevria shots are unsafe. Only 36% and 38% of Italians and Spaniards respectively, think the shots are safe. Interestingly, 77% of British survey participants think the AstraZeneca/Vaxzevria shots are safe.

 

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